It takes a gifted artist to become a great teacher and those who dare to teach never cease to learn.

Monday, February 28, 2011

Cafe Botanique, March 3 - Morrison center


Working toward Sustainable Solutions to Pest Plant Problems
By Cynthia Brown, PhD., CSU, Fort Collins, CO

Pest plants and their management have been on humanity’s mind since biblical times, and their importance is unlikely to diminish.  The best and most sustainable management of unwanted plants involves understanding their biology, the living and non-living elements of the environment in which they grow, and how these factors interact.  With this knowledge, we can choose the management tools at our disposal that will tip the balance in favor of plants we want and against those we don’t.  Importantly, successful management of unwanted plants means acquiring the mindset that success is an ongoing process, not a once-and-for-all solution.

Cynthia Brown majored in Biological Sciences at Stanford University, and then studied rangeland and restoration ecology at University of California, Davis for her doctorate.  She has been involved in grassland restoration research in California, Colorado and Minnesota, and she is especially interested in the role of restoration in the management of invasive plants.  Cynthia has been faculty of the Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management at Colorado State University for nearly 9 years.
Thursday, March 3, 2011
Denver Botanic Gardens – Morrison Center
6:30 – 8 p.m.
Register here

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