It takes a gifted artist to become a great teacher and those who dare to teach never cease to learn.

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Experience for Yourself


Experience for yourself the story of the most extensive scribal commission in the world since the end of the Middle Ages. This documentary is about Donald Jackson and his monumental work with the Saint John’s Bible and it describes among other things the calligraphic techniques and tells about the imaginary which incorporates symbols from Navajo basket-weaving patterns to microscopic views of today’s viruses and the local flora and fauna of Minnesota and Wales.

TWO VIEWINGS of the video documentary at DENVER BOTANIC GARDENS:

Ø       July 6th, 6 – 7 p.m., Mitchell Hall
Ø       July 7th, 12 noon – 1 p.m., Mitchell Hall

The Saint John's Bible is considered the Sistine Chapel of the modern era and overseen by the Benedictine monks at Saint John's Abbey in Minnesota. It is the first modern-day Bible entirely handwritten and illuminated in 500 years and made for 21st century. It is a collaboration project between Saint John's Abbey, University in Collegeville, Minnesota and Donald Jackson's Scriptorium in Monmouth, Wales.  Donald Jackson, the Artistic Director of the project is a renowned Western calligrapher and illuminator.
The original Bible when opened is 3 ft. wide and 2 ft tall, it includes 1150 velum pages divided in 7 different volumes. The first words were written on velum in early 2000 and the last volume was completed just a few weeks ago (the final presentation of the last volume was last week in Minnesota). Ancient techniques and tools were applied through the whole process, using old hand-ground ink on carefully selected calf-skin vellum for the text, gold and platinum for guilding, and turkey, goose or swan quills for the application.

A 3BM Television Production for BBC Wales and Saint John’s University with support from Target Corporation.
Approximate running time, 49 minutes

1 comment:

Diane Jones said...

Viewing this film was a fantastic
opportunity.
I would love to see this work in person.

Diane Jones